Tag Archives: real estate agent

Breakthrough in Bay Area Housing Sales

Housing Market

According to a recent report the Bay Area’s housing marketing reached the highest level of sales in nearly seven years.
Realtor’s president, Errol Samuelson said, “You’re seeing the marketing start to stabilize, which is a really good thing”. While sellers are benefiting from the large yearly gain in sales prices, buyers are finding it easier to move into the market. David Chung, a recent home buyer in Walnut Creek said,”We timed it well… These are incredibly low rates. I couldn’t be happier”.  Furthermore, Kevin Kieffer with Keller Williams in Danville states, “There’s enough owner-occupy buyers coming in to fill the gap, and they’re getting a better price”.

Carey, Pete. Bay Area Home Sales Hit Seven-Year High.  San Jose Mercury News. 15 Aug. 2013. Web. 26 Aug. 2013. http://www.mercurynews.com/business/ci_23869987/bay-area-home-sales-hit-seven-year-high>.

California Home Buying Process

 

Fig. 1 Besançon, Ellie. “Members are Using One Cool Thing!” California Real Estate Oct. 2012: 9. Print.

How do most people find their dream home? Home buying trends are changing. According to the California Association of Realtors, 80% of people found their home through an agent followed by websites, sale signs, and open houses. The data also reveals that home buyers today are looking at fewer homes before making the big move. What do you think of these statistics? (see fig. 1)

Meet Connie!

Connie Smith is a licensed Manufactured Home Sales Associate & Real Estate agent.  She started her career in the late 80’s working as a Realtor for Century 21 where she was awarded top producer three times.  As a San Jose native, she is very familiar with local the local housing market and its neighborhoods.

Connie joined the Alliance Family in June of 2007.  Since then, she has helped existing mobile home residents upgrade their homes to beautiful, brand new manufactured homes, sold single family residences, and helped first-time manufactured homeowners become owners; all while earning the title of Top Re-sale Agent in 2009 & 2010.

Her success has included selling listings in their first week on the market and properly educating clients on community living and purchasing. She attributes her success to the fact that the Alliance Team has a strong network of associates that enables her to provide quality products and services to her clients.  Having been in customer service for several years, Connie understands that customer satisfaction is of utmost importance.

For more information on our other experienced and qualified agents visit our website at http://www.alliancemh.com. We are excited to help you fulfill your dream of homeownership!

What is a Manufactured Home?

Manufactured housing (also known as prefabricated housing) is a type of housing unit that is largely assembled in factories and then transported to sites of use.

In the United States, the term manufactured housing specifically refers to a house built entirely in a protected environment under a federal code set by the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). The term mobile home describes factory-built homes produced prior to the 1976 HUD Code enactment.

The original focus of this form of housing was its mobility. Units were initially marketed primarily to people whose lifestyle required mobility. However, beginning in the 1950s, these homes began to be marketed primarily as an inexpensive form of housing designed to be set up and left in a location for long periods of time, or even permanently installed with a masonry foundation. Previously, units had been eight feet or less in width, but in 1956, the 10-foot (3.0 m) wide home was introduced. This helped solidify the line between mobile and house/travel trailers, since the smaller units could be moved simply with an automobile, but the larger, wider units required the services of a professional trucking company. In the 1960s and ’70s, the homes became even longer and wider, making the mobility of the units more difficult. Today, when a factory-built home is moved to a location, it is usually kept there permanently.

Both types of homes – manufactured and modular – are commonly referred to as factory built housing, but they are not identical. Modular homes are transported on flatbed trucks rather than beingtowed, and lack axles and an automotive-type frame. However, some modular houses are towed behind a semi-truck or toter on a frame similar to that of a trailer. The house is usually in two pieces and is hauled by two separate trucks. Each frame has five or more axles, depending on the size of the house. Once the house has reached its location, the axles and the tongue of the frame are then removed, and the house is set on a concrete foundation by a large crane. Most modern modular homes, once fully assembled, are indistinguishable from site-built homes. Their roofs are usually transported as separate units, eradicating the telltale roof line of the factory built home.

Source: Wikipedia